Catalog 2018-19 
    
    Nov 16, 2019  
Catalog 2018-19 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Addiction Studies

  
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    ADS 102 - Drug Use & Addiction

    3.00 credits
    An examination of commonly abused drugs with emphasis on the physical, psychological, and behavioral consequences of these drugs. Includes drug chemistry, physiological effects of drug use upon the body, and specific treatment formats and techniques. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ADS 150 - Basic Counseling & Addiction

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to the theory and practice of addictions counseling. Students will examine various counseling theories and begin developing their own approach to addictions counseling. Students will participate in guided practice to facilitate skill development. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ADS 152 - Group Counseling & Addiction

    3.00 credits
    Introduction and examination of the theory and practice of group counseling in addiction counseling. Students will examine various counseling theories and begin developing their own approach to addictions counseling. Students will participate in guided practice to facilitate skill development. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ADS 156 - Ethical & Professional Issues

    3.00 credits
    In-depth examination of counseling ethics with particular focus and attention paid to the role of the professional addictions counselor. Students will become familiar with the ethical guidelines of the ACCBO (Addiction Counselor Certification Board of Oregon) and the American Counseling Association. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ADS 157 - Risk Assessment & Intervention

    3.00 credits
    An examination of risk assessment and risk management. Topics will include such areas as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, suicide, and other areas of self-harm. Students will be able to identify ways in which harm reduction and management of high-risk behaviors in addictions counseling represents an important shift in the focus of addictions treatment. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ADS 280 - Coop Wk Exp: Addictions

    3.00 credits
    On-the-job, paid or volunteer, experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program. Instructor permission is required, and the student must locate a job site for the course. Prerequisite: TEX 280, previous coursework in ADS, and two years sobriety.
  
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    ADS 299 - Special Studies: Alcohol & Drug

    3.00 credits
    Provide concepts and/or skills on selected significant timely addiction treatment and/or alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs prevention (ATOD). Recommended: WRI 121 placement.

Apprenticeship

  
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    APR 100 - Electrical Fundamentals & Safety

    3.00 credits
    The apprentice will receive the technical knowledge of the skills required to become an electrician. This course will include concepts, trade math, basic electrical theory, safety regulations, and an introduction to the NEC.
  
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    APR 101 - Basic Electronics & Electrical Code

    3.00 credits
    This course provides an understanding of basic electrical theory, National Electrical Code, and local code requirements for electrical installation and safety regulations.
  
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    APR 102 - Electrical Theory & Code Changes

    3.00 credits
    This course will include the requirements for wiring and installation of electrical devices, transformers, overcurrents, wire devices, hazardous locations, and application of the NEC.
  
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    APR 103 - Understand the National Electrical Code & Safety

    3.00 credits
    Students will learn applied electrical theory, requirements for wiring and installation of electrical devices, auxiliary gutters, fuses and overcurrents, wire devices, hazardous locations, busways, and applicable NEC.
  
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    APR 104 - Intermediate National Electrical Code I

    3.00 credits
    This course is designed to familiarize the apprentice with aspects of electrical theory, power distribution, equations, calculations, and the 2008 NEC.
  
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    APR 105 - Intermediate National Electrical Code II & Safety

    3.00 credits
    Students will learn advanced applied electrical code, requirements for wiring and installation of electrical devices, motors, generators, and transformers.
  
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    APR 115 - Plumbing Code Part I & Jobsite Fundamentals/Safe

    3.00 credits
    This course will familiarize the apprentice with a brief history of plumbing laws, materials and methods for installation and maintenance of potable water systems, waste and sewage disposal, definitions, fundamentals, and the purpose of the UPC.
  
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    APR 116 - Plumbing Materials, Tools, & Equipment

    3.00 credits
    An introduction to the use and care of the tools and equipment of the plumber.
  
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    APR 118 - Plumbing Basic Installation

    3.00 credits
    This course will familiarize the student with techniques for installing drainage systems and water heaters.
  
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    APR 120 - Plumbing Code Part II & Safety

    3.00 credits
    This course presents the principles for supplying safe, potable water to residential, commercial, and institutional buildings according to local plumbing codes. The principles and code requirements for safe removal of sewage, waste, and storm water are covered with emphasis on use of the code book and drawing interpretation.
  
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    APR 121 - Mathematics, Calculations, & Safety

    3.00 credits
    The student will learn mathematics for plumbing technology.
  
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    APR 122 - Soldering, Brazing, Welding, & OSHA Regulations

    3.00 credits
    A course in basic welding for the plumbing industry. The course includes theory and safety procedures in oxyacetylene cutting, soldering, and brazing of copper tubing.
  
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    APR 130 - Basic Industrial Maintenance & Safety

    3.00 credits
    This course will give the student a broad overview of measurements found in an industrial setting. In addition to the basic measurements of length, temperature, energy, force, and power, the student will learn how materials are measured and handled in bulk quantities. The student will also gain a thorough knowledge of how safe practices are an important part of working in any industrial setting. Every industrial worker should be familiar with accident prevention techniques, fire safety methods, and the use of personal protective equipment.
  
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    APR 131 - Mathematics & Blueprint Reading

    3.00 credits
    This course will give the student knowledge of arithmetic and basic mathematics, metric measurement, and calculator fundamentals. The student will also develop skills of deciphering print into a variety of views.
  
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    APR 132 - Basic Machine Shop & Using Hand Tools & Materials

    3.00 credits
    Students will get a broad overview of the basic industrial skills and knowledge needed by an entry-level machinist. Students will also get an introduction to hand tools; they’ll learn about various types of tools as well as how to use them safely. Next, students will be introduced to a group of hand tools which most technicians use daily, including wrenches, pliers, screwdrivers, and hammers. Students will also learn the correct ways to safely use and take care of these tools.
  
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    APR 133 - Intermediate Maintenance & Safety

    3.00 credits
    In this course students will learn safety rules and procedures, basic physics, basic electricity and electronics, applied mathematics, measuring and layout operations, hand tools, power tools, lubricants, bench work skills, and basic troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    APR 134 - Industrial Machinery I

    3.00 credits
    In this course students will learn safety rules and procedures, basic physics, basic electricity and electronics, applied mathematics, measuring and layout operations, hand tools, power tools, lubricants, bench work skills, and basic troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    APR 135 - Industrial Welding

    3.00 credits
    Students will use a variety of welding processes, welding equipment, and other metal working tools appropriate and necessary for the task of joining metals. They will learn and practice procedures, terminology, and appropriate safety precautions as applied to oxy-acetylene use and shielded metal arc welding processes.
  
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    APR 200 - Intermediate National Electrical Code III & Safety

    3.00 credits
    Emphasizes the use and understanding of the NEC. Topics include cable, raceway, busway, cable bus, switches, panel boards, lighting, heating equipment, transformers, the taking of practice exams, and safety.
  
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    APR 201 - National Electrical Code Fundamentals & Theory

    3.00 credits
    This course will include advanced concepts, trade math, A/C and D/C theory, and NEC code.
  
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    APR 202 - Advanced National Electrical Code Study I

    3.00 credits
    This course reviews the NEC. It is designed to assist the student with various aspects of taking and passing the Oregon State Electrical License Exam.
  
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    APR 203 - Advanced National Electrical Code Study II

    3.00 credits
    This course reviews the NEC. It is designed to assist the apprentice with various aspects of taking and passing the Oregon State Electrical License Exam.
  
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    APR 204 - National Electrical Code Test Preparation

    2.00 credits
    This course reviews the NEC. It is designed to assist the apprentice with various aspects of taking and passing the Oregon State Electrical License Exam.
  
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    APR 205 - Journeyman’s Exam Preparation

    2.00 credits
    This course reviews the NEC. It is designed to assist the apprentice with various aspects of taking and passing the Oregon State Electrical License Exam.
  
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    APR 215 - Plumbing Code Part III Theory & Safety

    3.00 credits
    This course prepares the student to prepare for the code exam. Application of theory through hands-on activities. Reviews the concepts of Code 1 and Code 2.
  
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    APR 216 - Industrial & Commercial Plumbing

    3.00 credits
    The student will gain knowledge in service and maintenance, plumbing installation and repair, mathematical calculations, methods of water treatment, the principles of heat transfer, and the UPC.
  
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    APR 217 - Plumbing Service & Repair

    3.00 credits
    This course will focus on plumbing service and repair according to the UPC.
  
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    APR 218 - Plumbing Code Overview

    3.00 credits
    This course prepares the student to prepare for the code exam. Application of theory through an overview of concepts in the UPC.
  
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    APR 219 - Plumbing Code Part IV Overview

    2.00 credits
    This course prepares the student for the code exam. Application of theory through hands-on activities reviews the concepts of the UPC.
  
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    APR 220 - Uniform Plumbing Code Test Preparation

    2.00 credits
    This course prepares the student for the code exam.
  
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    APR 230 - Advanced Industrial Maintenance & Safety

    3.00 credits
    This course will give the student an advanced overview of measurements found in an industrial setting. In addition to measurements of length, temperature, energy, force, and power, the student will learn how materials are measured and handled in bulk quantities. The student will also gain a thorough knowledge of safe practices is an important part of working in any industrial setting. Every industrial worker should be familiar with accident prevention techniques, fire safety methods, and the use of personal protective equipment.
  
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    APR 231 - Industrial Machinery II

    3.00 credits
    In this course students will learn safety rules and procedures, physics, electricity and electronics, shop mathematics, shop blueprint reading, sketching, and layout, hand tools, power tools, lubricants, bench work skills, and troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    APR 232 - Industrial Troubleshooting & Theory

    3.00 credits
    An advanced study of the techniques used in troubleshooting various types of industrial equipment to include mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems and their control devices. Emphasis will be placed on the use of schematics and diagrams in conjunction with proper troubleshooting procedures.
  
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    APR 233 - Industrial Jobsite Fundamentals & Safety

    3.00 credits
    This course gives the student a broad overview of the basic industrial skills and knowledge needed by an apprentice. The student will learn on-the-job tasks such as working with metal cutting machinery/milling machines, drilling machines, lathes, and grinders. Safety procedures relating to job tasks using metal shop machinery are an essential part of this course. A thorough knowledge of safe practices is an important part of working in any industrial setting.
  
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    APR 234 - Industrial Maintenance & Machinery Overview

    2.00 credits
    In this course students will learn safety rules and procedures, basic physics, basic electricity and electronics, applied mathematics, measuring and layout operations, hand tools, power tools, lubricants, bench work skills, and basic troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    APR 235 - Millwright Professional

    2.00 credits
    Students completing this program will have a sound understanding of the safety requirements and tools used within the program and in the millwright trade. Students will be able to identify safety hazards and appropriate responses to safety issues. A math review will provide students with exposure to the types of problems millwrights can expect while working in the trade, and students will have an understanding of the expectations of a millwright working in various industry settings.

Automotive Technology

  
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    AMT 101 - Workplace Skills Training

    4.00 credits
    Workplace Skills Training is in direct response of automotive industry needs for students to possess the basic skills indicative of certified automotive technicians. The course design encourages students in developing life skills necessary to locate gainful employment in the automotive industry. Instructional focus includes: seeking and applying for employment, preparing resumes, filling out applications, interviewing techniques, personal appearance and communication skills. Furthermore, emphasis is placed upon the skills required to retain industry employment including: punctuality, regular attendance, following directions, general shop practices, productivity, hourly and flat rate compensation, time clock management, problem solving, employee loyalty and responsibility, employee professionalism and good customer service skills. The class will provide theory and related hands-on experience on live vehicles as the foundation for advanced automotive courses.
  
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    AMT 103 - Maintenance and Light Repair

    2.00 credits
    The class will provide theory and related hands-on experience on live vehicles as the foundation for advanced automotive courses. Instructional focus includes shop safety, hazardous material handling practices, common hand tools, basic shop equipment, basic diagnostic equipment, measuring systems and tools, fasteners, service information, preventive maintenance, tire and wheel assembly service, up-sell theory, basic theories and math, and common automotive industry terms and industry standards. The student will become familiar with minor vehicle repair procedures including but not limited to changing vehicle fluids and filters, inspection and repair of minor fluid leaks, inspection and replacement of belts and hoses, and inspection and repair of various timing components. Prerequisite: AMT 101.
  
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    AMT 110 - Automotive Electrical/Electronic Systems

    8.00 credits
    This course provides instruction in basic electricity and electronic systems. This course provides the theory and operating characteristics of automotive electrical and electronic systems required for successful completion of ASE area A6: Electrical/Electronic Systems. Instructional focus includes: electrical principles, basic circuit configuration, Ohm’s law, electrical components, wiring and wiring repairs, common tools and testing equipment, basic testing and problem isolation. The student will work with multimeters and other electrical test equipment in developing troubleshooting techniques required for successful diagnosis of automotive starting and charging systems, advanced electronic systems, automotive processing units, multiplexing, electrical accessories and body/chassis electronic control systems. Corequisite: Verifiable registration/attempted testing of ASE area A6: Electrical/Electronic Systems.
  
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    AMT 115 - Automotive HVAC Systems

    5.00 credits
    This course provides the basic theory and operating characteristics of automotive refrigeration systems required for successful completion of ASE area A7: Heating and Air Conditioning and the Federal Automotive Refrigeration Test. Instructional focus includes: safety precautions, environmental concerns, tooling, system identification, principles of refrigeration, states of matter, effects of pressure on gases and vapors, pressure-temperature relationships, basic refrigeration cycle, refrigerant types, refrigeration system components and cooling system components. Laboratory work includes proper handling of refrigerants, troubleshooting and basic servicing of these systems utilizing strategy-based diagnostics required for contemporary service of HVAC systems. Corequisite: Verifiable registration/attempted testing of ASE area A7: Heating and Air Conditioning. Corequisite: Successful completion of Federal Refrigeration Test is mandatory.
  
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    AMT 130 - Automotive Engine Theory & Service

    5.00 credits
    This course provides the basic theory and operating characteristics of automotive engines and related systems required for successful completion of ASE areas A1: Engine Repair and A8: Engine Performance. Instructional focus includes: engine classification, engine identification, lubrication and cooling systems, sealing materials, high performance theory and engine systems diagnosis with emphasis on: engine removal, disassembly, inspection and contemporary repair and reassembly procedures. Corequisite: Verifiable registration/attempted testing of ASE area A1: Engine Repair.
  
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    AMT 143 - Automotive Fuel Delivery Systems I

    5.00 credits
    This course builds upon learned automotive engine theory, component operation and system repair practices required for successful completion of ASE area A1: Engine Repair and A8: Engine Performance. Instructional focus includes: fuel performance, air-fuel mixtures, general fuel system diagnosis/service, fuel delivery and open/closed loop carburetor theory, pre-OBDII system standards, system components, system sensors, outputs and actuators, system function, terms, diagnostic scan tools and computerized carburetor system operation, diagnosis and function testing. Students develop troubleshooting/repair techniques by utilizing structured diagnostic stratagems. Corequisite: Verifiable ration/attempted testing of ASE area A1: Engine Repair or ASE area A8: Engine Performance.
  
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    AMT 145 - Automotive Fuel Delivery Systems II

    5.00 credits
    This course builds upon learned automotive engine theory, component operation and system repair practices required for successful completion of ASE area A8: Engine Performance. Instructional focus includes: basic fuel injection theory, throttle body injection, port fuel injection, sequential fuel injection, central port fuel injection, direct fuel injection, regulation systems, fuel management strategies and fuel injection system service concerns, OBD-II and IM240 system standards, Class II Serial Data, GMLAN and CAN system theory, drive cycle requirements, Mode 6 fundamentals, system components, system sensors, outputs and actuators, system functions, terms, diagnostic scan tools and function testing. Students continue developing troubleshooting/repair techniques by utilizing structured diagnostic stratagems. Prerequisite: AMT 143 or instructor approval. Corequisite: Verifiable registration/attempted testing of ASE area A1: Engine Repair or ASE area A8: Engine Performance.
  
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    AMT 250 - Manual Drive Train & Axles

    5.00 credits
    This course provides basic theory required for successful completion of ASE area A3: Manual Drive Train and Axles. Instructional focus includes: clutch operation, clutch diagnosis, clutch maintenance, clutch service, basic gear theory transmission/transaxle design, shift mechanisms, synchronizer theory, power flow, gear ratios, system electrical, fluid service, disassembly and reassembly procedures, four-wheel drive theory, transfer case theory, four-wheel drive operation, all-wheel drive theory, all-wheel drive components and systems, diagnostic procedures, disassembly and reassembly procedures, CV Joint identification, CV Joint service, U-Joint identification, U-Joint operation, RWD differentials, differential service, diagnosis and inspection. Students develop trouble-shooting/repair techniques by utilizing structured diagnostic stratagems based upon contemporary procedures. Emphasis is placed upon modern repair practices.
  
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    AMT 260 - Automatic Transmission & Transaxles

    5.00 credits
    This course provides the basic theory required for successful completion of ASE area A2: Automatic Transmission/Transaxle along with ATRA areas: Diagnostician, R&R Technician and Rebuilder. Instructional focus includes: Transmission identification, hydraulic theory, planetary gear theory and operation, torque converter operation, hydraulic governor operation, friction elements, valve body theory, electronic controls, diagnostic procedures, in-vehicle service/adjustments and removal procedures, unit tear down, inspection and rebuild, road/service bay testing, DTC P1870 issues, shifting quality issues, performance enhancements, shift quality improvements and aftermarket practices. Students develop trouble-shooting/repair techniques by utilizing structured diagnostic stratagems based upon current OEM/aftermarket procedures. Emphasis is placed upon modern repair practices and warranty service issues.
  
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    AMT 270 - Automotive Steering, Suspension & Alignment

    5.00 credits
    This course provides basic theory required for successful completion of ASE area A4: Automotive Suspension and Steering. Instructional focus includes: suspension system theory, front suspension components, front suspension service, rear suspension components, rear suspension service, electronic steering system theory, system electrical/electronics, steering system theory, manual steering, power steering, steering components, variable effort steering system theory and components, steering system service, alignment geometry theory, wheel alignment equipment, front wheel inspection and alignment procedures and four-wheel alignment procedures. Corequisite: Verifiable registration/attempted testing of ASE area A4: Suspension and Steering.
  
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    AMT 275 - Automotive Brake Systems

    5.00 credits
    This course provides the basic theory required for successful completion of ASE area A5: Brakes. Instructional focus includes: principles of hydraulic brake systems, system components, brake system inspection, system hoses and tubing, master cylinder operation, booster systems and operation, brake systems diagnosis, drum brake design, operation and service, disc brake design and operation, front-wheel disc brake components, component inspection and service, all-wheel disc brake components, all-wheel disc brake inspection and service, pulse variation/lateral run-out concerns, antilock brake theory, types of antilock brake systems, antilock components, system electrical/electronics, basic RWAL operation, basic four-wheel ABS operation, traction control systems, stability control systems, antilock brake diagnosis and service. Students continue to develop trouble-shooting/repair techniques by utilizing structured diagnostic stratagems and current industry procedures.
  
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    AMT 287 - Automotive Service & Repair Practices

    10.00 credits
    This course compliments all automotive technology courses and requires current workplace experience or internship under the supervision of an ASE-certified technician in selected industry settings. The student will be challenged with the use of tools and service literature. Students will diagnose and repair live automotive concerns complimenting learned principles and allowing for integration of knowledge and practice for achievement of basic level skill competency. This course is intended to improve your performance as a professional automotive technician. All personal, vehicle, and environmental safety precautions will be practiced. Prior experience or instruction for repair projects is required. AMT 287 requires verifiable employment and/or completion of assigned NATEF task requirements for credit. AMT 287 may coincide with student enrollment in Automotive Service Technology 200-Level courses.
  
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    AMT 287A - Automotive Service and Repair Practices

    2.00 credits
    This course compliments all automotive technology courses, and requires current workplace experience or internship under the supervision of an ASE-certified technician in selected industry settings. The student will be challenged with the use of tools and service literature. Students will diagnose and repair live automotive concerns complimenting learned principles and allowing for integration of knowledge and practice for achievement of basic level skill competency. This course is intended to improve your performance as a professional automotive technician. Prerequisite: AMT 101.
  
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    AMT 287B - Automotive Service and Repair Practices

    8.00 credits
    This course compliments all automotive technology courses, and requires current workplace experience or internship under the supervision of an ASE-certified technician in selected industry settings. The student will be challenged with the use of tools and service literature. Students will diagnose and repair live automotive concerns complimenting learned principles and allowing for integration of knowledge and practice for achievement of basic level skill competency. This course is intended to improve your performance as a professional automotive technician. Prerequisite: AMT 101.
  
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    AMT 299 - Special Studies: Automotive Technology

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of AMT not usually covered in depth in other AMT courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in AMT.

Animal Science

  
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    ANS 121 - Intro to Animal Science

    4.00 credits
    Principles of breeding, physiology, nutrition, and management as they apply to modern livestock and poultry production. Recommended: BIO 101.
  
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    ANS 215 - Beef/Dairy Industry

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to beef and dairy industries: history, current industry status, demonstration, and practice of basic husbandry skills. Prerequisite: ANS 121 or instructor approval. Corequisite: ANS 215L.
  
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    ANS 215L - Beef/Dairy Industry Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to ANS 215. Corequisite: ANS 215.
  
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    ANS 216 - Sheep/Swine Industry

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to the sheep and swine industries including history, current status and production practices, with demonstration and hands-on experience of basic husbandry practices. Prerequisite: ANS 121 or instructor approval.
  
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    ANS 220 - Intro to Horse Science

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to horses, their history, breeds, form and function, performance evaluation, current industry status, and general management.
  
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    ANS 231 - Livestock Evaluation I

    2.00 credits
    This course will include visual appraisal of market and breeding classes of beef cattle, sheep, swine, and goats. This will include live animal carcass evaluation. Recommended: ANS 121. Corequisite: ANS 231L.
  
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    ANS 231L - Livestock Evaluation I Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to ANS 231. Corequisite: ANS 231.
  
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    ANS 232 - Livestock Evaluation II

    2.00 credits
    Continuation of ANS 231. This course will include visual appraisal of market and breeding classes of beef cattle, sheep, swine, and goats. This will include live animal carcass evaluation. Recommended: ANS 121. Prerequisite: ANS 231. Corequisite: ANS 232L.
  
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    ANS 232L - Livestock Evaluation II Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to ANS 232. Corequisite: ANS 232.
  
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    ANS 280 - Coop Wk Exp: Animal Science

    2.00 credits
    On-the-job, paid or volunteer, experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program so that the student can learn all aspects of the industry. Cooperative work experience is offered for variable credit based on the student’s objectives. Instructor permission is required, and the student must locate a job site for the course. Prerequisite: TEX 280.
  
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    ANS 298 - Independent Study: Animal Science

    1.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of ANS not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ANS.
  
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    ANS 299 - Special Studies: Animal Science

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of ANS not usually covered in depth in other ANS courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ANS.

Agriculture

  
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    ARE 211 - Management in Agriculture

    3.00 credits
    Economic and business principles applied to the management of agribusiness firms including: farms and ranches; goal setting and management information; planning and decision-making tools; acquiring, organizing, and managing land, labor and capital resources.
  
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    ARE 221 - Marketing in Agriculture

    3.00 credits
    Organization and functions of domestic and international markets; market channels for various agricultural commodities; role of agribusiness, cooperatives, and government in marketing decisions. Prerequisite: ARE 250.
  
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    ARE 250 - Intro to Ag/Environmental Economics

    3.00 credits
    Examines how economic forces and social institutions cause environmental degradation and help build management solutions. Explains key economic concepts for valuing environmental resources and evaluating the trade-offs of alternative management approaches from private markets to regulation. Applies the concepts and theories to topical environmental issues such as water pollution and conserving biodiversity.
  
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    ARE 253 - Natural Resource/Agricultural Law

    4.00 credits
    Historical development, current structure, and organization of Anglo/Norman-American constitutional, statutory, and case law including related agency regulatory or administrative law. Relationships among legal processes, economic principles, social institutions, and natural resources issues are emphasized. Students also are exposed to the basic elements of legal research. Prerequisite: WRI 122.
  
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    ARE 280 - Coop Wk Exp: Ag Resource Economics

    2.00 credits
    On-the-job paid or volunteer experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program so that the student can learn all aspects of the industry. Cooperative work experience is offered for variable credit based on the student’s objectives. Instructor permission is required and the student must locate a job site for the course. Prerequisite: TEX 280.

Anthropology

  
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    ATH 101 - Intro to Physical Anthropology

    3.00 credits
    Introduces physical anthropology and the study of human biological evolution in the context of modern genetics and primate behavior studies. Examines the human fossil record, as well as the diversity and commonality of present and past populations of humankind. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ATH 102 - Intro to Archeology & Prehistory

    3.00 credits
    Introduces the methods and techniques used by archaeologists to study the development of human culture. Provides a survey of world prehistory while emphasizing the development of social complexity and the origins of agriculture that precede both New World and Old World civilizations. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ATH 103 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology

    3.00 credits
    Examines modern human cultures. Analyzes a variety of ethnographic examples from various world societies to understand the diverse aspects of language, technology, economy, social structure, governance, religion, world views, and expressive aspects of life. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ATH 198 - Independent Study: Anthropology

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of ATH not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ATH.
  
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    ATH 199 - Special Studies: Anthropology

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of ATH not usually covered in-depth in other ATH courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ATH.

Art

  
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    ART 102 - Intro to Art History: Visual Arts

    3.00 credits
    This course is an introduction to Western visual art from antiquity to 1945. Students learn a perspective of history through its visual footprint and gain an understanding of the changing purpose of art and the role of artists in relation to their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: WRI 095.
  
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    ART 115 - Basic Design: 2D Black & White

    3.00 credits
    Studio course introducing 2D black-and-white foundations centered on creative problem solving. Establishes critical skills and personal artistic vision. Investigates a broad range of materials, techniques and projects to explore black-and-white design concepts with reference to historical and contemporary perspectives.
  
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    ART 116 - Basic Design: 2D Color

    3.00 credits
    Studio course introducing 2D color foundations centered on creative problem solving. Establishes critical skills and personal artistic vision. Investigates a broad range of materials, techniques and projects to explore color design concepts with reference to historical and contemporary perspectives.
  
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    ART 117 - Basic Design: 3D Foundations

    3.00 credits
    Studio course introducing foundations of 3D design and spatial organization. Emphasizes innovative problem solving with varied media. Establishes critical skills and artistic vision. Incorporates range of materials and techniques to explore 3D concepts with reference to historical and contemporary perspectives.
  
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    ART 131 - Intro to Drawing

    3.00 credits
    A studio experience exploring basic drawing techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. A conceptual framework for critical analysis is presented along with basic art theory. College-level reading comprehension is recommended. You will be expected to purchase materials for this course based on a list provided by the instructor. Material costs will be approximately $80. May not be taken concurrently with ART 231.
  
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    ART 154 - Ceramics I

    3.00 credits
    Students are introduced to form, function, and surface that constitutes work in clay. Basic technique processes are learned to successfully construct hand-built clay projects whether utilitarian or sculptural. The course addresses the “how-to of clay” through supporting slides, lectures, and guest artists. Recommended: ART 117.
  
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    ART 155 - Ceramics II

    3.00 credits
    A studio experience challenging students to explore their own creativity in clay, using multiple techniques and materials while encouraging discussion of related ideas and issues. Class will be supported using slides, lectures, and guest artists. Recommended: ART 117. Prerequisite: ART 154 or instructor approval.
  
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    ART 156 - Ceramics III

    3.00 credits
    This is a comprehensive, self-motivated lab class, utilizing research of form and function and exploration of design to successfully complete hand-built projects in clay. Students are encouraged to foster the development of a personal idiom in design and construction. Prerequisites: ART 154 or ART 155 and ART 117, or instructor approval.
  
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    ART 198 - Independent Study: Art

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of ART not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ART.
  
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    ART 199 - Special Studies: Art

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of ART not usually covered in depth in other ART courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ART.
  
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    ART 206 - History of Western Art - Beginning 1300 AD

    3.00 credits
    This course examines visual art and architecture as a reflection of human interaction with the socio-political and physical environment of a particular era. The objectives of the course center on viewing, analyzing and comparing many art forms in a historical context and covers the Renaissance and Baroque periods beginning about 1300 AD. Recommended: WRI 121.
  
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    ART 211 - Mod Art Hist - 19th Century Art in Europe

    3.00 credits
    The 19th century saw the beginning of the modern world and modern societies in Europe. Course examines and analyzes the visual arts, beginning with the French Revolution in 1789, to reveal the processes that led to our current cultural life. Recommended: WRI 121.
  
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    ART 211M - Mod Art Hist: Early 19th Century to 1920

    5.00 credits
    Examines and analyzes the visual arts, beginning with the early 19th century and extending to approximately 1920, to reveal the processes that influenced the formation of culture in our contemporary society. Recommended: WRI 121.
  
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    ART 212 - Mod Art Hist - Early 20th Century Art

    3.00 credits
    The turn of the 20th century witnessed revolutions in science, technology, psychology, and philosophy. Course examines and analyzes the visual arts to reveal some effects of those changes and to gain insight into our modern world. Recommended: WRI 121.
  
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    ART 213 - Mod Art Hist - Art Since 1945

    3.00 credits
    World War II ended the supremacy of Europe in the visual art world and focused attention on America. Course examines and analyzes art since 1945 to explore the ideas behind it, reveal our culture and values, and to gain a greater understanding and appreciation of contemporary art. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    ART 213M - Mod Art Hist: 1920 to Present

    5.00 credits
    Examines and analyzes the visual arts, beginning with approximately 1920 and extending to the present, to reveal the processes that led to the formation of culture in our contemporary society. Recommended: WRI 121.
  
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    ART 214 - Native American Art Through the Ages

    3.00 credits
    A discussion class, this is an exploration of Native American art forms, politics, and religion in the precontact and postcontact eras. A variety of topics will be discussed including, but not limited to, the effects of Western culture on Native American tribes and their art. Class lectures will be supported by slides, guest speakers, and museum visits. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ART 231 - Drawing II

    3.00 credits
    A studio experience with supporting slides, lectures, and occasional films. Further exploration of different ways of seeing and drawing to become more visually literate. Course presents intermediate or advanced drawing techniques and materials. Employs conceptual references for critical analysis of visual forms, along with basic theories of art within the historical context. You will be expected to purchase materials for this course based on a list provided by the instructor. Material costs will be approximately $80. Prerequisite: ART 131.
  
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    ART 234 - Figure Drawing

    3.00 credits
    This is a studio experience with students drawing the human figure using live models utilizing a plethora of mediums: pencil, charcoal, Prismacolor, pastels, and paints. Class will be supported by internet research, slides, lectures, and guest models.
  
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    ART 265 - Art for Teachers

    3.00 credits
    Students will gain experience with a variety of art materials appropriate for use in the classroom. This course addresses the challenge of learning the “how- to” of art while preparing to teach the same to children.
 

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