Catalog 2018-19 
    
    Dec 09, 2019  
Catalog 2018-19 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Education

  
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    EDU 232 - Educational Psychology

    3.00 credits
    Explore research-based psychological principles that enhance student learning.
  
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    EDU 251 - Overview of the Exceptional Learner

    4.00 credits
    Introduction to diverse conditions of students with special needs in public schools. Identifies and defines the following areas of exception ability: learning disabilities, emotional and behavior disorders, intellectual disabilities, severe and multiple disabilities, autism, health impairments, physical disabilities, communication disorders, vision impairments, hearing loss, traumatic brain injury, and talented and gifted.
  
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    EDU 252 - Behavior Management

    3.00 credits
    This course will define and apply behavior management theory and practice in the context of a classroom or individual learning environment. Particular emphasis will be placed on development of observation and assessment skills. Recommended: Prior study in EDU.
  
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    EDU 258 - Multicultural Education

    3.00 credits
    Introduces the philosophy, activities, and materials applied in developing a culturally sensitive multicultural classroom and curriculum.
  
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    EDU 260 - Instructional Strategies

    4.00 credits
    Designed to enable student to achieve beginning competencies in unit and lesson planning, instructional models, modes of presentation and participation, and assessment. Recommended: Prior study in EDU.
  
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    EDU 268 - Intro to Developmental Disabilities

    3.00 credits
    Provides background information on teaching techniques, expected achievement levels, goals and objectives for working with educable, trainable, and severely retarded students. Emphasizes physical and mental development from birth and familiarity with the known causes, classifications, and terminology used in the field of special education.
  
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    EDU 269 - Intro to Teach Students with Learning Disabilities

    3.00 credits
    Defines terms associated with learning disabilities and behavior disorders. Includes diagnostic procedures, remedial programs, and approaches and resources.
  
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    EDU 280 - Coop Wk Exp: Education

    2.00 credits
    On-the-job, paid or volunteer, experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program. Cooperative work experience is offered for variable credit based on the student’s objectives. Instructor permission is required. All students must successfully pass a criminal background check. Prerequisite: TEX 280 is on a case-by-case basis.
  
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    EDU 282 - Intro to Adult Learning Theory

    3.00 credits
    This courses teaches the essentials of current adult learning theories and how to address the teaching styles of diverse adult student populations.
  
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    EDU 283 - Community College Teaching Methods

    4.00 credits
    This course covers the principles and techniques of effective instruction for community college level teaching including lesson planning, instructional models of adult learning, as well as modes of presentation, facilitation, and participation.
  
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    EDU 284 - Community College Learning Assessment

    4.00 credits
    This course teaches how to evaluate and report student performance at the community college level using a variety of formative and summative measures.
  
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    EDU 285 - Capstone: Community College Teaching

    1.00 credits
    This course requires direct application of learning gained from all previous courses within the Community College Teaching Certificate program. Students construct a course layout proposal for a new or existing course including a course syllabus, assessment instruments, lesson plans, lecture outlines, grading criteria, as well as textbooks and other learning materials.
  
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    EDU 286 - Online College Teaching Methods

    4.00 credits
    This course covers the principles and techniques of effective instruction for online teaching including the use of a variety of electronic delivery tools, lesson planning, instructional models of adult learning, as well as modes of presentation, facilitation, and participation.
  
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    EDU 287 - Online College Learning Assessment

    4.00 credits
    This course teaches how to evaluate and report student performance within the online modality using a variety of formative and summative measures.
  
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    EDU 288 - Capstone: Online College Teaching

    1.00 credits
    This course requires direct application of learning gained from all previous courses in the program. Students must construct a course layout proposal for a new or existing online course including a course syllabus, assessment instruments, lesson plans, lecture outlines, grading criteria, as well as textbooks and other learning materials. Prerequisite: EDU 282, EDU 286, and EDU 287.
  
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    EDU 298 - Independent Study: Education

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of EDU not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in EDU. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    EDU 299 - Special Studies: Education

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of EDU not usually covered in depth in other EDU courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in EDU. Prerequisite: WRI 121.

Emergency Medical Technician

  
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    EMT 101 - Emergency Medical Tech Refresher

    3.00 credits
    This refresher course is designed to assure that EMTs maintain up-to-date proficiency in the knowledge and skill areas which are pertinent to their scope of practice that reflect both the NREMT and state requirements. Prerequisites: Current Oregon EMT licensure.
  
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    EMT 120 - Emergency Medical Service: First Responder

    3.00 credits
    For those who are usually the first persons at the scene of trauma or medical emergencies including law enforcement, fire department personnel, etc. Knowledge and skills are developed to provide basic trauma care in medical and environmental emergencies, evaluation of scene and patients, and appropriate access and use of the emergency medical services system. Instructor permission required.
  
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    EMT 151 - Emergency Medical Technician Part 1

    3.00 credits
    Course is designed to develop student skills in the recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries and the proper procedures of emergency care. Permission of a designated KCC advisor is required. Prerequisites: Completion of the Current American Heart Association Health Care Provider CPR or American Red Cross Basic Life Support for the Professional Rescuer CPR, and all required immunizations. Prior to beginning clinical rotations, students are required to submit a criminal background check and drug screen. Recommended: WRI 121 and MTH 111. Corequisite: EMT 151L. NOTE: Successful course completion does not guarantee state certification.
  
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    EMT 151L - Emergency Medical Tech Part 1 Lab

    2.00 credits
    Course is designed to develop student skills in the recognition of signs and symptoms of illnesses and injuries, and proper procedures and emergency care. Permission of designated KCC advisor required. Prerequisites: Completion of the Current American Heart Association Health Care Provider CPR or American Red Cross Basic Life Support for the Professional Rescuer CPR, and all required immunizations. Prior to beginning clinical rotations, students are required to submit a criminal background check and drug screen. Recommended: WRI 121 and MTH 111 Corequisite: EMT 151.
  
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    EMT 152 - EMT II

    4.00 credits
    Course is a continuation of EMT 151. Includes preparation for state and national certification exams. Permission of designated KCC advisor required and successful completion of clinical rotation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EMT 151. Corequisite: EMT 152L. NOTE: Successful course completion does not guarantee state certification. NOTE: Successful course completion does not guarantee state certification.
  
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    EMT 152L - EMT II Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to EMT 152. Corequisite: EMT 152.
  
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    EMT 169 - EMT Rescue

    3.00 credits
    Provides technical information on various rescue situations. Covers equipment, tools, trench rescue, shoring, ropes and knots, warehouse searches, outdoor searches, rescue in situations involving elevation differences, patient packaging, water and ice rescue, and vehicle extrication.
  
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    EMT 176 - Emergency Response Patient Transportation

    2.00 credits
    Provides technical information regarding ambulance operations, laws, maintenance and safety, emergency response driving, and route planning.
  
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    EMT 177 - Emergency Response Communication/Documentation

    2.00 credits
    Documentation of the elements of patient assessment, care, and transport; communication systems; radio types; reports; codes; and principles of therapeutic communication.
  
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    EMT 198 - Independent Study: Emergency Medical Tech

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of EMT not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in EMT.
  
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    EMT 199 - Special Studies: Emergency Medical Tech

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of EMT not usually covered in depth in other EMT courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Recommended: Prior study in EMT.
  
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    EMT 251 - Advanced Emergency Medical Technician Part 1

    5.00 credits
    Develops skills for recognizing symptoms of illness and injuries. Covers proper procedures of emergency care at the Advanced EMT level. Part one of the two-part Advanced EMT course sequence. Prerequisites: Must pass a drug screen and criminal background check; current Oregon EMT licensure.
  
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    EMT 252 - Advanced Emergency Medical Technician Part 2

    5.00 credits
    Develops skills for recognizing symptoms of illness and injuries. Covers proper procedures of emergency care at the Advanced EMT level. Continuation of AEMT Part 1. Part two of the two-part Advanced EMT course sequence. Prerequisite: EMT 251. Must pass a drug screen and criminal background check. Current Oregon EMT licensure.
  
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    EMT 280 - Coop Wk Exp: Emergency Medical Tech

    2.00 credits
    On-the-job, paid or volunteer, experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program so that the student can learn all aspects of the industry. Cooperative work experience is offered for variable credit based on the student’s objectives. Instructor permission is required and the student must locate a job site for the course. Prerequisite: TEX 280.

Emergency Response and Operations

  
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    ERO 100 - Intro to Emergency Response and Operations

    3.00 credits
    Prepares students for a career in emergency services. This course includes an overview of emergency medical services, law enforcement services and firefighter services, career opportunities within and related fields.
  
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    ERO 101 - Incident Command System

    3.00 credits
    This course introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. Topics include: leadership and management, delegation of authority and management by objectives, functional areas, and positions, briefings, organizational flexibility, transitions and transfer.
  
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    ERO 103 - Legal Aspects of Emergency Services

    3.00 credits
    Students learn the federal, state, and local laws that regulate emergency services, national standards influencing emergency services, standard of care, tort, liability, and a review of relevant court cases.
  
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    ERO 105 - GPS, Map and Compass

    2.00 credits
    Introduction to use of topographic maps, compass, and portable GPS. Students will explore map scale, resolution, and accuracy. Projections and coordinate systems will be introduced. Differential GPS corrections will also be explored.
  
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    ERO 110 - Emergency Vehicle Operator (EVOC)

    1.00 credits
    Designed to enhance safe vehicle operation by stressing theory and principles of defensive driving in both emergency and non-emergency situations. Oregon motor vehicle laws pertinent to the operation of emergency vehicles is included in the course. This class is not designed to teach the student to drive but rather to explain how emergency driving differs from non-emergency driving. Although some driving experience will be gained through the practical exercises, it is strongly recommended that the student have adequate driving experience in the vehicle. Prerequisite: 18 years of age.
  
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    ERO 115 - Crisis Intervention

    3.00 credits
    An introduction to crisis response for first responders of an emergency or significant incident or event. This course will assist those who are assisting people in the immediate aftermath of a disaster or other type of tragedy. Students will learn how to reduce initial stress, gather information, debrief, and produce an environment of connectedness to empower communities to heal in the recovery process.
  
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    ERO 125 - Hazardous Materials Awareness and Operations

    1.00 credits
    Designed to prepare individuals to safely respond to hazardous materials emergencies. Individuals will learn to analyze an incident, detect the presence of hazardous materials, survey the scene, collect hazard information from the DOT Emergency Response Guidebook, implement actions consistent with standard operating procedures, initiate protective actions, and initiate the notification process.

English

  
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    ENG 104 - Intro to Literature (Fiction)

    3.00 credits
    Explores fiction as an art form that provokes thought and challenges social norms. Examines fictional works, such as short stories and novels, from diverse cultures and historical periods; considers these works as expressions of human experience. Corequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 105 - Intro to Literature (Drama)

    3.00 credits
    Examines dramatic literature as an art form that provokes thought and challenges social norms. Examines plays from diverse cultures and historical periods, and considers them as expressions of human experience. Corequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 106 - Intro to Literature (Poetry)

    3.00 credits
    Enhances enjoyment of poetry, increases understanding of the conventions of poetry and poetic forms, and encourages exploration of human experience. Recommended: 100-level reading and WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 195 - Film Studies: Film as Art

    3.00 credits
    Explores the art of filmmaking from its origins in the silent era of the 1890s, through the talkies and musicals of the early 20th century, modernist, experimental post-WWII films, up to the most recent trends and developments. Considers how film is shaped by, and in turn, shapes its time period and culture. Students learn to analyze how visual, auditory, stylistic, and technical components come together as an integrated work of art. Prerequisite: WRI 095.
  
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    ENG 201 - Shakespeare’s Early and Middle Works

    3.00 credits
    Explores the development of Shakespeare’s art and contribution to literature, culture, and the English language with a focus on histories, tragedies, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry prior to 1602. Students will read and view four or more plays and selected non-dramatic poetry in order to introduce the study of Shakespeare’s dramatic techniques, character development, and language. The works are chosen to reflect a broad range of patterns, themes, and genres. Recommended prior coursework: ENG 104, ENG 105, and ENG 106. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 202 - Shakespeare’s Late Works

    3.00 credits
    Explores the development of Shakespeare’s art and contribution to literature, culture, and the English language with a focus on histories, tragedies, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry after 1602. Students will read and view four or more plays and selected non-dramatic poetry in order to introduce the study of Shakespeare’s dramatic techniques, character development, and language. The works are chosen to reflect a broad range of patterns, themes, and genres. Recommended prior coursework: ENG 104, ENG 105, and ENG 106. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 206 - Survey of English Literature 19th & 20th Century

    3.00 credits
    Literature of the British Isles: 19th and 20th century selections, beginning with Wordsworth and ending with contemporary works. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 213 - Latin American Literature

    3.00 credits
    Studies various Latin American literatures, such as works of Hispanic, indigenous, and Afro-Caribbean origin. All readings are in English. Recommended: 100-level reading. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 214 - Literature of the Northwest

    3.00 credits
    Studies fictional, factual, and poetic works by Northwest writers from before the arrival of Euro-Americans to the present. Emphasized relationship between Northwest writing and Northwest social, cultural, and physical environment. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 216 - Introduction to Literature for Children and Young Adults

    3.00
    Introduces literature written for children and young adults from genres such as picture books, folktales, comics, novels, poetry, and film. Examines the gendered, political, cultural, and ideological dimensions of the literature, as well as issues of didacticism and censorship. Prerequisite: WRI 121 or concurrent enrollment.
  
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    ENG 220 - Intro to Non-European Literature

    3.00 credits
    An overview of the literature of one or more non-European cultural groups, including fiction, poetry, drama, and expository prose. Subtitles and cultural groups may vary. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 240 - Intro to Native American Literature

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to Native American Studies and oral and written composition by Native Americans from both before and after contact with Euro-Americans. Provides historical, geographical, political, social, religious, linguistic, aesthetic, and ethno poetic contexts for understanding the various tribal literatures studied. Recommended: Some background or experience in literature is desirable. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 255 - Survey of American Literature 1900 to Present

    3.00 credits
    Introduces students to the literature of North America from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Revolves around oral and written manifestations of peoples creating and recreating American culture. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 258 - African American Literature

    3.00 credits
    Introduces the modern and contemporary literature of Americans whose roots are in Africa. Emphasizes the period following the Harlem Renaissance. Introduces the writings which came to age after the Harlem Renaissance as well as contemporary writings. May focus on experimental writings to understand ways of African and early African American tropes as used in new innovative ways. Focuses on oral and written texts representing interests, aspirations, and experiences of African Americans. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 260 - Intro to Women Writers

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to Women Writers as examination of writing by women. Students read poetry, fiction, plays, diary, essay, and journal entries by women from various places and periods. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 261 - Literature of Science Fiction

    3.00 credits
    Introduces science fiction. Explores historical and contemporary themes. Covers a variety of authors and examines the art and function of this genre. Recommended: 100-level reading. Prerequisite: WRI 121.
  
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    ENG 298 - Independent Study: English

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of ENG not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ENG.
  
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    ENG 299 - Special Studies: English

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects not usually covered in depth in other English courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ENG.

Environmental Studies

  
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    ENV 105 - GPS, Map & Compass

    2.00 credits
    Introduction to use of topographic maps, compass, and portable GPS. Students will explore map scale, resolution, and accuracy. Projections and coordinate systems will be introduced. Differential GPS corrections will also be explored.
  
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    ENV 141 - Tree & Shrub Identification

    3.00 credits
    Introduction to tree and shrub identification. Learn to identify the principal forest trees of North America and the principal trees and shrubs of the Pacific Northwest. Learn to use appropriate dichotomous keys in the field.
  
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    ENV 170 - Environmental Science

    3.00 credits
    Examines major environmental questions facing the world today. Includes population growth, matter and energy resources, ecosystems, pollution, and environment and society. Explores a broad range of environmental issues including sustainability, the interconnection of the economy with ecosystem, short-term versus long-term gains, and the trade-offs in balancing problems and solutions. Recommended: Placement into WRI 095. Corequisite: ENV 170L.
  
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    ENV 170L - Environmental Science Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to ENV 170. Corequisite: ENV 170.
  
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    ENV 198 - Independent Study: Environmental Science

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of ENV not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ENV.
  
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    ENV 199 - Special Studies: Environmental Science

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of ENV not usually covered in depth in other ENV courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ENV.
  
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    ENV 212 - Environmental Issues

    4.00 credits
    Discussion and analysis of contemporary problems, including waste disposal, resource utilization, water and air quality, impacts of manufacturing processes, conflict resolution, and ethical issues. Identification of agencies and professionals, sources of information, and planning processes. Prerequisites: ENV 170.
  
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    ENV 241 - Forest Ecology

    3.00 credits
    Basic physiological characteristics of trees, succession, climax, and related concepts. Vegetation classification, stand structure, diversity, competition, growth, soils-forests interactions, biomass and nutrient distribution, energy relations, nutrient element dynamics, and ecology of disturbances. Corequisite: ENV 241L.
  
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    ENV 241L - Forest Ecology Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities related to ENV 241. Corequisite: ENV 241.
  
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    ENV 280 - Coop Wk Exp: Environmental Science

    2.00 credits
    On-the-job, paid or volunteer, experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program so that the student can learn all aspects of the industry. Cooperative work experience is offered for variable credit based on the student’s objectives. Instructor permission is required and the student must locate a job site for the course. Prerequisite: TEX 280.
  
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    ENV 298 - Independent Study: Environmental Science

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of ENV not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ENV.
  
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    ENV 299 - Special Studies: Environmental Science

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of ENV not usually covered in depth in other ENV courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in ENV.
  
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    ENV 299L - Special Studies: Environmental Science Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to ENV 299. Corequisite: ENV 299.

Fire Science (Structural)

  
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    FRP 111 - Fire Fighter I

    5.00 credits
    This entry-level fire training program prepares the student for the skill competencies required for the Firefighter I certification process. This course can also be used, in whole or part, as refresher training. The structure firefighter training includes: Level 1 Introduction to Fire Services; Level 2 Fire Ground Support; Level 3 Exterior Firefighting; and Level 4 Interior Firefighting.
  
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    FRP 112 - Fire Fighter II

    3.00 credits
    This advanced level fire training program prepares the student for the skill competencies for the Firefighter II certification process. The structure firefighter training includes Level 5 Advanced Firefighter Training. Prerequisite: FRP 111.
  
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    FRP 121 - Fire Behavior and Combustion

    3.00 credits
    This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled. Instruction in fire behavior and control, matter and energy, units of measurement, flammable liquids, toxic gases, chemicals, radioactive hazards, and firefighting techniques.
  
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    FRP 122 - Fire Codes, Related Ordinances and Investigation

    3.00 credits
    Provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Includes history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention division, use and application of codes and standards, plans review, fire inspections, fire and life safety education, and fire investigation.
  
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    FRP 132 - Fire Apparatus and Equipment

    3.00 credits
    Theory of pump operation, types and features of various pumps, practical operation of fire pumps and accessories. Includes drafting, hydrant and tanker operations, and rule-of-thumb fireground hydraulic calculations. Topics addressed include the different types of fire apparatus and their function including wildland firefighting apparatus and municipal apparatus.
  
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    FRP 179 - Wildland Urban Interface

    3.00 credits
    This course is designed to assist structure and wildland firefighters who will be making tactical decisions when confronting wildland fire that threatens life, property, and improvements in the wildland/urban interface. Instructional units include interface awareness, size-up, initial strategy and incident action plan, structure triage, structure protection tactics, incident action plan assessment and update, follow-up and public relations, and firefighter safety in the interface.

General Agriculture

  
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    GAG 100 - Careers in Agriculture & Natural Resource Mgmt

    3.00 credits
    This course explores the career opportunities available in agriculture and natural resource management.
  
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    GAG 280 - Coop Wk Exp: General Agriculture

    2.00 credits
    On-the-job, paid or volunteer, experiences which allow for the application and development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned through the on-campus program so that the student can learn all aspects of the industry. Cooperative work experience is offered for variable credit based on the student’s objectives. Instructor permission is required and the student must locate a job site for the course. Prerequisite: TEX 280.
  
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    GAG 291 - Implements

    3.00 credits
    Covers power farming implements including operation, maintenance, adjustments, calibration, and use. Field trips may be required.
  
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    GAG 299 - Special Studies: General Agriculture

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of GAG not usually covered in depth in other GAG courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GAG.

Geology

  
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    GEL 201 - Physical Geology I

    3.00 credits
    Introduces physical geology which deals with minerals, rocks, internal structure of the earth, and plate tectonics. Corequisite: GEL 201L.
  
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    GEL 201L - Physical Geology I Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to GEL 201. Corequisite: GEL 201.
  
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    GEL 202 - Physical Geology II

    3.00 credits
    Introduces physical geology which deals with mass wasting, streams, glaciers, deserts, beaches, groundwater, and use of topographic maps. Corequisite: GEL202L.
  
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    GEL 202L - Physical Geology II Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to GEL 202. Corequisite: GEL 202.
  
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    GEL 203 - Historical Geology

    3.00 credits
    Introduces historical geology, which deals with geologic time, fossils, stratigraphic principles, and the geologic history of the North American continent. Corequisite: GEL 203L.
  
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    GEL 203L - Historical Geology Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to GEL 203. Corequisite: GEL 203.
  
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    GEL 207 - Geology of the Pacific NW

    3.00 credits
    Introduces the regional geology of the Pacific Northwest with emphasis on Oregon geology. Includes basic geologic principles and earth materials.
  
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    GEL 298 - Independent Study: Geology

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of GEL not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GEL.
  
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    GEL 299 - Special Studies: Geology

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of GEL not usually covered in depth in other GEL courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GEL.

Geography

  
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    GEO 105 - Physical Geography

    3.00 credits
    Introduces students to the geographical study of earth’s physical landscape and process. Topics include the biosphere, geosphere, atmosphere, and human-environment interactions. Concepts are applied to a variety of regions including Oregon and the Klamath Basin. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    GEO 106 - Human Cultural Geography I

    3.00 credits
    Introduces students to the science of human geography. Concepts are applied to a variety of Western regions including the Klamath Basin, the Americas, and Western Europe. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    GEO 107 - Human Cultural Geography II

    3.00 credits
    Introduces the study of human cultural geography with a focus on developing nations. Regional topics include the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Islands. Recommended: WRI 121 placement.
  
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    GEO 198 - Independent Study: Geography

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of GEO not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GEO.
  
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    GEO 199 - Special Studies: Geography

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of GEO not usually covered in depth in other GEO courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GEO.
  
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    GEO 206 - Geography of Oregon

    3.00 credits
    Examines various historical, social, economic, and geographic factors that have made the Oregon landscape unique.
  
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    GEO 221 - Field Geography: The Local Landscape

    3.00 credits
    Introduces the use of field research methods and observation techniques as tools to understand the cultural, physical, and historical geography of Southern Oregon. Combines field trips, historical research, and working with basic data and tools.
  
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    GEO 298 - Independent Study: Geography

    3.00 credits
    Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of GEO not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students must complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GEO.
  
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    GEO 299 - Special Studies: Geography

    3.00 credits
    Special topics, activities, or projects in an area of GEO not usually covered in depth in other GEO courses. Offered for variable credit, based on the student’s accomplishments. Instructor permission is required prior to registration. Recommended: Prior study in GEO.

General Science

  
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    GSC 107 - Physical Science (Astronomy)

    3.00 credits
    Surveys astronomy to include historical development of the Universe, Earth as a planet, Earth’s moon, planets of the Solar System, the Sun, stars, and galaxies. Corequisite: GSC 107L.
  
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    GSC 107L - Phy Sci Astr Lab

    1.00 credits
    Laboratory activities relating to GSC 107. Corequisite: GSC 107.
  
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    GSC 108 - Oceanography

    3.00 credits
    This course explores the ocean including the geomorphology of the sea floor and subsurface strata, as well as the changing chemistry of seawater. It will also look at the oceans ecosystems and their relationships as a subsystem of the biosphere, as well as maritime influences on the weather and climate. This course will focus on understanding the relationships among all of these factors and the activities and endeavors of humans to project long-term effects of that relationship. Corequisite: GSC 108L.
 

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